Snow cream: the magic of snow in the kitchen

The immaculate whiteness and crystalline texture of snowflakes provide Chefs with an exquisite source of visual and textural inspiration, encouraging them on occasion to try to recreate the look and feel of snow in their dishes.
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Snow cream: the magic of snow in the kitchen

The immaculate whiteness and crystalline texture of snowflakes provide Chefs with an exquisite source of visual and textural inspiration, encouraging them on occasion to try to recreate the look and feel of snow in their dishes. This is what stirred Jet Tila to create Kuma Snow Cream, a Taiwanese-style ice cream made with organic milk. Snow is rarely used as a cooking or pastry-making ingredient. And yet! Snow cream is a firm favourite with Canadians and Americans who love to eat this dish every year, and was particularly popular with the elites in France and England in the 15th and 16th centuries.

Making snow cream is simple; just collect some fresh fallen snow in a bowl (let the snow fall for at least an hour to ensure it is as pure as possible). Blend it with condensed milk, vanilla extract and sugar, and then add a beaten egg. The result? A deliciously light and airy texture that is meltingly smooth. Lighter than a classic ice-cream, softer than "shave ice" (ice that is shaved thinly to give it a snow-like consistency), creamier than a sorbet: snow cream is like no other frozen dessert you may have tried. For a moment of pure indulgence, you can add various toppings to taste: fruit coulis, crushed almonds, cocoa powder, fresh fruits, caramel and syrup are just a few examples. A childhood souvenir of many Chefs, snow cream has enthused the chef Brian Henry*, who proposes a version flavoured with Riesling. Simple, fun-filled comfort food to (re)discover this winter!

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